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seed to bloom cannabis chart

How to use the Plagron Feeding Chart

If you’re looking to grow your own professional cannabis plants, regardless of growing preferences, you should definitely go with the Plagron feeding chart. You can choose between various different growing methods, additives and even substrates from Plagron. With their feeding chart you’ll be able to follow clear instructions that can make for professional results in cannabis plants.

Plagron opened up for business back in 1992. It initially started off as a simple worm farm, but nowadays it’s an international leader when it comes to plant fertilizers. The best thing about this high-end fertilizer brand is the wide variety of products that they have in stock. If you already know about Plagron, go ahead and skip to the feeding charts – we’re going to do a quick run-through of some of their best products.

They have quite an efficient yet simple way of categorizing their products into colors:

  • Green: NATURAL
  • Red: TERRA
  • Blue: HYDRO
  • Orange: COCO
  • Purple: UNIVERSAL

This means that you can choose the right substrate and corresponding base fertilizers, alongside the Plagron universal additives.

Click here to see all the Plagron products

Plagron Feeding Chart Substrates

Thanks to the amount of diverse products that Plagron has to offer, you can choose from a large list of different substrates; they stock organic, mineral and even coco coir substrates. Each substrate reflects in the Plagron feeding chart below.

Lightmix: This substrate doesn’t contain many nutrients, which allows for a more rigorous control of your plants’ feeding schedule. When growing cannabis using this substrate, you’ll need to be quite on top of them and add any extra nutrients using base fertilizers and additives. This substrate contains non-organic minerals.

Growmix: This is a heftier version of the previous substrate, as it contains the perfect proportion of nutrients to feed your plants during the first few weeks of their growth process. You won’t need to fertilize as much when using this type of substrate. It also contains non-organic minerals.

Allmix: This substrate is absolutely choc-full of organic nutrients, which is why we highly recommend its use for organic and natural crops. It comes with plenty of nutrients too, so you don’t even need to use a base fertilizer for the growth period, which can cause accidental over-feeding.

Royalmix: Just like Allmix, this substrate contains quite a high amount of nutrients. In fact, if you want to grow your plants using just this substrate without needing to add any other fertilizers; you’ll probably get some pretty decent results. All you have to do is adjust your pH when you water your plants. If you use additives you’ll get some of the best possible results.

Batmix: This particular substrate is designed to allow you to improve and increase aroma, effect and flavor in your buds in a fully organic manner. It’s great for autoflowering plants, allowing you to grow them without needing to use anything but pure water. Best results come from seasonal strains, specially when using the necessary additives as well

Plagron Feeding Chart Base Fertilizers

Alga Grow & Bloom: These two products are organic base fertilizers used in cannabis plants. They have a high content in natural algae. We do not recommend using these products in drip irrigation or automatic systems; as it does not fully dissolve and may end up blocking your pipes. Grow & Bloom are sold separately, and if you use a nutrient-rich substrate you may not even have to use Alga Grow.

Terra Grow & Bloom: These bases are mineral in origin and you can use them to obtain some truly professional results. Terra Grow contains a little extra nitrogen, which is exactly what your plants need during the growth period, whereas Terra Bloom contains much more potassium and phosphorus, which are needed in larger amounts during the flowering period.

Cocos A & B: This two-part base fertilizer is highly concentrated. They’re specifically made for growing in coco coir substrates, adjusting the pH of your water automatically so that you don’t have to. Keep in mind that coco coir substrates come with hardly any nutrients at all, which is why giving them such an intense diet is so important.

Hydro A & B: Another two-part base fertilizer, Hydro A&B is a product that’s designed specifically for hydroponic growing. It contains all of the necessary nutrients for plants grown hydroponically, and it won’t block any of your pipes or cause any sort of damage. When grown in an aquatic medium, the only source of nutrients that your plants have is what you give them via the water, so you’ll need to keep this in mind. That’s why Hydro A+B is such a highly concentrated product.

Plagron Feeding Chart Additives:

Power Roots: This particular additive is used to stimulate your plants’ roots – it’s one of Plagron’s universal products which is generally used with every different feeding chart in order to increase root size. Regardless of your preferred growth method, you can use Power Roots in order to increase the size and health of your cannabis roots.

Vita Race: If you’re looking for a potent growth and flowering stimulant, Vita Race is the perfect additive for you. Give your plants a little extra iron in order to keep them strong and green. Iron is incredibly important to cannabis plants, and if you give them a little extra all of these important processes are accelerated and stimulated. Your plants will grow much stronger, capable of absorbing more energy from the light and improving their metabolism in general. This product is used once a week exclusively as a spray.

Green Sensation: This additive is used alongside the necessary base fertilizers during the bud-fattening period. It can be used to increase and improve the flavor and aroma in your buds, as well as considerably increasing yield. This universal product can be used in any growing medium.

Pure Zym: This particular combination of enzymes is capable of helping you to increase microbial life in your cannabis plants’ substrate. Essentially, it tracks down your plants’ dead roots and turns them into nutrients that they can absorb. It also frees up a lot of space for new roots to grow where the dead ones were – this increases root size and therefore, plant size in general.

Other Products

The products we just covered are main ingredients in the Plagron feeding chart, however they have quite a lot of other more specific products such as pH adjusters and root stimulants for saplings and seeds.

Calcium Kick: this product is used to adjust any calcium or magnesium deficiencies in your plants, which tend to be the culprit of certain issues once your plants begin to flower. If you use pure or osmosis water, you will need to use this product. It’s also capable of adjusting the pH in your substrate.

Seedbooster Plus: If you tend to have issues when it comes to germinating your seeds or you’re simply looking to accelerate the process, Seedbooster Plus by Plagron can give you a hand with that. It gives seeds an incredibly small amount of nutrients and enzymes, and it can be used to revive old seeds and make them germinate. It also gives your plants enough nutrients to stimulate the first few roots and initial growth.

pH +/-: Some of Plagron’s products can adjust pH automatically, although not all of them can – that’s why they have specific pH adjusters for increasing or lowering acidity, as well as a fully organic pH- product for the flowering period, which is made out of citric acid.

How to use the Plagron Feeding Chart

One of the most basic things to keep in mind is that you’ll need to measure and adjust your pH as is needed while growing. Plagron feeding charts indicate the EC that your plants should be receiving each week. The amount of nutrients that your plants can absorb is directly affected by the pH of the nutrient solution you’re feeding them with. PH cannabis levels must range between 5.5 and 6.5, but you can adjust it even further depending on the method you are using and the phase your plants are in.

All measurements are per 10L of water, and the EC values assigned are for tap water – regardless, EC should never go over 3.0.

Organic Chart

If you plan on growing using organic nutrients, this is the feeding schedule you’re looking for. It has various different substrate choices, all of which are organic, and it also comes with Plagron’s universal and organic additives. Keep in mind that feeding charts are a simple guide; you may be growing a sativa plant outdoors, which will need more growth and flowering weeks. In cases such as these, you’ll need to use this chart as a guide, adding more growth or flowering weeks if necessary. The reaction that your plants have to this feeding schedule may differ depending on the strain, your climate and how much experience you have.

ALWAYS flush your plants’ roots out towards the end of the flowering period. This can be done by using just water for a week or two or by using a specific product designed for flushing plant roots.

Soil Chart

This chart is for those that would prefer to grow in soil and use mineral products. You can choose between two different substrates and use all of their universal additives that make for some of the best possible results. Keep in mind that feeding charts are a simple guide; you may be growing a sativa plant outdoors, which will need more growth and flowering weeks. In cases such as these, you’ll need to use this chart as a guide, adding more growth or flowering weeks if necessary. The reaction that your plants have to this feeding schedule may differ depending on the strain, your climate and how much experience you have.

ALWAYS flush your plants’ roots out towards the end of the flowering period. This can be done by using just water for a week or two or by using a specific product designed for flushing plant roots. Make sure to try and keep your EC at the same level indicated in the chart – these levels indicate the EC of your nutrient solution after adding the necessary products for that particular week. EC should never go over 3.0.

Coco Chart

For those that prefer to grow using coco coir slabs or bricks, this feeding chart contains the perfect doses of nutrients; coco coir is quite poor in nutrients, which is why this chart is so stacked. You’ll still need to keep in mind that feeding charts are a simple guide; you may be growing a sativa plant outdoors, which will need more growth and flowering weeks. In cases such as these, you’ll need to use this chart as a guide, adding more growth or flowering weeks if necessary. The reaction that your plants have to this feeding schedule may differ depending on the strain, your climate and how much experience you have.

ALWAYS flush your plants’ roots out towards the end of the flowering period. This can be done by using just water for a week or two or by using a specific product designed for flushing plant roots. Make sure to try and keep your EC at the same level indicated in the chart – these levels indicate the EC of your nutrient solution after adding the necessary products for that particular week. EC should never go over 3.0.

Hydro Chart

For the fastest and biggest results, our recommendation is to grow hydroponically. Your plants’ only nutrient source in aquatic media is whatever you decide to give it via water, so you’ll need to keep a close eye on your plants when using this system. Keep in mind that feeding charts are a simple guide; you may be growing a sativa plant outdoors, which will need more growth and flowering weeks. In cases such as these, you’ll need to use this chart as a guide, adding more growth or flowering weeks if necessary. The reaction that your plants have to this feeding schedule may differ depending on the strain, your climate and how much experience you have.

ALWAYS flush your plants’ roots out towards the end of the flowering period. Do this by using just water for a week or two or by using a specific product designed for flushing plant roots. Make sure to try and keep your EC at the same level as in the chart – these levels indicate the EC of your nutrient solution after adding the necessary products for that particular week. EC should never go over 3.0.

Everything You Need to Know About Light Depping

Light depping at its simplest is mimicking light conditions to force your plants to flower. It is also known as light deprivation or “depping.” Most commonly, light depping is used to mimic Fall light conditions, which will force cannabis plants to flower earlier in the season.

Understanding Light Deprivation

When it comes to light depping, all you are really doing is tricking the plant into thinking it is the Fall season. Once the plant thinks that Winter is coming, it begins to produce a large amount of flower. It does this to prepare to produce seeds that would drop to the top soil and keep the plant alive for next year. However, you won’t end up with seeds at the end of your light dep run. Instead, you will end up with sweet and delicious cannabis to use as you wish.

To trick the plant, you simply need a light protective tarp to put over your greenhouse. This will allow you to manipulate the hours your plants see light and do not, which is exactly what we’re aiming for.

Why light dep in the first place?

There are number of reasons people choose to light dep. For starters, it means you could potentially get a few extra harvests in each year. With the ability to start early, you can be pulling down a light dep harvest right before Summer planting should begin.

Additionally, when you grow within a more controlled environment, you are able to more easily control pests. Therefore, your ability to grow stronger and healthier plants increases. And, who doesn’t love strong and healthy cannabis plants? We know we sure do!

Lastly, the reason we light dep, to avoid male pollinators in the air. Unfortunately, where we are located, we have a lot of hemp farms surrounding us. Since many of the hemp farms nearby are not sexing their crops, there would have been male pollinators in the air. Because of this, if we had planted for the normal outdoor growing season, we would have likely ended up with plants chock full of seeds. And, no one would have been a happy camper.

Instead, we opted to plant early, pull the tarp and still reap the benefits of the harvest via light depping.

Setting Up A Light Dep Environment

In order to mimic the light conditions, you will need a few supplies first. These include the following:

  • A greenhouse or hoop house
  • Light proof plastic
  • Proper ventilation setup

There are a number of ways you can choose to set this up as well. Whether you want to build raised beds, use 30 gallon or larger pots or plant directly into your soil, the choice is yours.

Our Light Dep Setup

Personally, we built two raised beds that fit three plants each in them. Once the beds were built, filled, amended and baked for a few weeks, we went back out and built a hoop house out of cattle fencing over the two raised beds. By bending the cattle fencing and bolting it to some two-by-fours, we were able to create a simple, yet effective hoop house. With a walkway in the middle, so we could easily access all of the plants.

Plus, since the cattle fencing has large openings, we could easily inspect the harder to reach spots from the outside. After that, we simply purchased a large tarp to throw over the hoop house, which was weighed down on the ends, so no light seeped in.

Ready, set, let’s grow!

Now that you’re all set up and ready to go, there are just a few more things you should be aware of on your journey to successfully light depping.

Make a Schedule

First, you will want to make a schedule and stick to it. Think about it, the sun doesn’t get to sleep in, does it? Nope, so neither do you! If you decide that pulling the tarp at 5 AM is what’s needed, be prepared to wake up that early for the next two months.

To decide on the times you should have the greenhouse covered, you’ll want to look at:

  • the sun’s position in relation to your plot,
  • when the plants will be shaded,
  • and your schedule.

This will help you determine when the best times to keep your plants uncovered and covered is.

For example, if your plants are fully exposed to the harsh evening sun and humidity, you may want to look at covering them earlier in the evening, then pulling the tarp back off once the sun sets to let them breathe for the evening (see below about ventilation).

In the end, it all really depends on your region’s temperatures, humidity and light conditions.

Ventilate

However, beware! If you choose to put your tarp on late in the evening, you need to remember that it has the opportunity to build up loads of moisture throughout the evening. As the Earth begins to cool for the evening, all of that moisture will be trapped within your greenhouse. And, that’s leaving you susceptible to mold – gross!

To prevent this, you have a few options. Typically, in greenhouses, you will see an exhaust fan on one side and intake shutters on the other. This allows for nice air flow throughout the greenhouse.

However, if you made a hoop house from material lying around the yard like we did, it’s a little more difficult. For us, we simply chose to wake up super early and throw the tarp over prior to the sun rising. Then a few short hours later, we would pull the tarp right back off. This way, the plants were only covered each day for a few hours. Thus, not allowing moisture or mold to form on the plants.

Of course, if you aren’t a morning person or are looking for a simpler way to do this, they do sell electronic arms. These arms pull the tarp on and off and can even be put on a timer system. Don’t worry, we’ll be investing in one soon enough!

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Avoid Light Leaks

With the electronic arm, you can almost always guarantee that your tarp won’t get ripped or shredded along the paneling of your hoop house. However, most of us aren’t fortunate enough to own of those, so here we are manually pulling and putting the tarp on every day; sometimes more than once a day.

Of course, this means you may end up with light leaks, which you don’t want. If you purchase an extra durable tarp, you should be free and clear of light leaks, but if you went on the cheaper end, you may be dealing with a little bit of a mess.

During your growing season, you may want to dive into that pitch black hoop house to ensure there are no leaks. The simplest and best time to do this is right before you pull the tarp off in the morning.

Since the plants are already expecting to see the sun in a few minutes, they won’t mind a little sun from you hopping in their house. Now that you’re in, simply look around and see if you can see any light coming in. If you can, grab the duct tape and some spare tarp, then get to patching those holes up.

It’s important to do checks like this every week or so. If you choose not to, you may be disappointed come harvest time, as your plants won’t have had the chance to fully develop.

Remember, it’s essential that your plants get twelve hours of consecutive darkness to flower properly.

Start from Clones

Okay, so you’re all set up and have the best tips to create the perfect environment for your cannabis plant friends, but do you really want to start from seed? Heck no!

Do you know what that involves? Determining males from females, waiting for them to get large enough to even flower out in the first place, possible plant weaknesses and so much more!

So, we strongly recommend you start from clones for your light dep harvest. By doing so, you can be sure that your plants are the “cream of the crop” prior to planting outdoors.

Whether you purchase the clones or made them yourself, you will need to do a few things prior to planting them outdoors. Most likely, your clones came from indoor grows. And, if this is the case, you need to know that they aren’t used to the full power of the sun or wind.

Due to this, you will want to harden them off. To do this, simply bring the plants outside for a few hours each day, so they are able to get used to the sun and weather conditions in your area. You will want to increase the length of time outside over the course of a few weeks.

Once you believe the clones are strong enough to endure the outdoors full time, get ready to start transplanting them!

Caring for Your Light Dep Garden

Now that everything is planted and ready to start growing, there’s not much else to do. Of course, you will want to be sure to water regularly, as well as check your plants for any deficiencies.

Once the plants begin to stretch, you may find it necessary to add a trellis, net or tomato cage around the plants for support. We ended up having to use two nets at varying heights over the course of the growing season to ensure the plant remained upright.

Additionally, you will notice that many bottom branches are attempting to produce buds, but they are small and not quality flower. If this begins to occur, you can choose to trim back some lower branches. This will allow for the plant to focus more of its efforts on the large top buds instead.

Another option, if you don’t want to chop away at your plant, is to let it keep on growing naturally. If you choose to do this, when it comes harvest time, do not chop your plant off at the base. Instead, chop away the large top branches and leave the bottom branches intact.

Then, go have fun trimming all that bud and leave the rest to continue flowering for another week or two. By doing this, the bottom branches will now have a chance to form larger buds. This allows you to harvest the rest of the plant once it reaches the end of its grow cycle. Thus, getting a little extra out of your harvest.

Alright, you’re ready to start light depping! Now, go grow some stuff and let us know how it goes!

Growing Autoflowers

Growing auto flowering varieties has become quite popular amongst the new generation of hobby growers due to their fast turnaround and compact size, making them ideal for many new and experienced growers.

Auto flowering varieties completely mature from seed to harvest in 8-12 weeks, which means they are not subject to photoperiodism.

Autos are Day-neutral plants which means they flower without regard to photoperiod.

Plants like Canna (short-day plants) flower without an inductive photoperiod, the induced photoperiod merely causes flowering to occur sooner, this is known as facultative photoperiodism.

Short-day plants vegetate best when the daylight hours are extended beyond normal. When the day hours are longer, the P-fr (Far-red) stores, cannot fully decay before the light comes back on, keeping the plant in a vegetative state.

Short-day plants exposed to a longer dark period (12+ hours) are able to fully decay their built-up stores of p-fr, which initiates phytochrome to trigger flowering.

For some plants, the requirement for a dark period is absolute, they are classified as long-night plants and they will not flower until exposed to long nights, this is known as obligate photoperiodism.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GROW & TRANSPLANT AUTOS?

  • Despite popular belief, you can start your seedling in a much smaller pot than the suggested final container.
  • Germinate the seed in preferred starter plug/cube. (See germination tutorial)
  • Once the seed has its first pair of serrated true leaves transplant the plug to a 100ml pot using coco: perlite mix (70:30)
  • The seedling will thrive in this pot over the next 7-14days
  • Once the seedling has developed a nice root ball we now transplant to the final pot very carefully (Always wear gloves)
  • Now the plant is in its final pot we must feed daily, obviously, we want a moist pot, not saturated, if it is saturated then only feed small amounts of food, and try to encourage consumption.

AUTOS AND LIGHTING

  • Week 1 – 2 Medium light exposure (18/6)
  • Week 3 – 10 High light exposure (16/8)
  • Week 10 – 12 Medium light exposure (12/12)

*Note: Germination (7-10 day’s) low light levels, ideally T5 lighting. (20/4)

AUTOFLOWERING pH & EC

Like any plant we are feeding, we don’t go straight to the max dose, rather a gradual build of nutrition, relative to the growth of the plant.

Over the entire grow most Auto’s will generally not consume an EC above 1.8, in fact an EC higher will create the exact opposite of the intended outcome.

Less is more with Auto’s, for example here is a chart that should help you understand the building blocks of an auto;