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popping old cannabis seeds

Vaping Weed without removing Seeds

I’m lucky enough to find an occasional seed. It’s very rare, but sometimes I’ll find one. And I would never dream of vaping it, it would be a huge waste!

Now if I was still getting seedy Mexican bud like I used to back in the day, I would try and remove as many seeds as possible, but if a stray one ended up in my vaporizer I don’t think it would hurt it at all.

Slightly off topic but I’ve heard you can vape stems if necessary, they do have some THC. In my combustion days I never would have smoked stems, but I don’t see a problem in vaping them. Combustion of the stems would taste terrible and probably kill most of the THC before it reaches your lungs.

Joel W.
Deplorable Basement Dweller
  • Jul 31, 2016
  • #7
Squiby
Well-Known Member
  • Jul 31, 2016
  • #8

Long live the SEED!

Remove and plant.

Then reap what you sow.

Dramma Lamma
Looks like a job for!
  • Jul 31, 2016
  • #9

Ideally pick seeds out of the herb and save it. With how GMO’s are looking I’m all about keeping as many seeds as possible. Can’t grow what you don’t have working seeds for.

Beyond that If you miss a seed and grind it up into your vape bowl, you will notice the flavor change from the herb itself. This will make the vapor more bitter and acrid, also if the temp is high enough you can crack/pop seed pieces as well making it worse.

At this point if I miss and grind up a seed into my herb sesh, that herb all typically goes straight to the AVB container once I notice the ground seed.

Vapor_Eyes
taste buds
  • Jul 31, 2016
  • #10

Ideally pick seeds out of the herb and save it. With how GMO’s are looking I’m all about keeping as many seeds as possible. Can’t grow what you don’t have working seeds for.

Beyond that If you miss a seed and grind it up into your vape bowl, you will notice the flavor change from the herb itself. This will make the vapor more bitter and acrid, also if the temp is high enough you can crack/pop seed pieces as well making it worse.

At this point if I miss and grind up a seed into my herb sesh, that herb all typically goes straight to the AVB container once I notice the ground seed.

BabyFacedFinster
Anything worth doing, is worth overdoing.
  • Jul 31, 2016
  • #11

I haven’t seen a seed in my herb since I started buying in a dispensary. If I did, I’d plant it for the hell of it.

Like others have said, back in the day, street weed was full of seeds. It was fun to sit there, break up some weed and separate out the stems. Then you would put your herb at the top of a vinyl double record album, I liked to use the Beatles White album, and let the seeds roll down into the crease of the cover.

There was no Leafly or sativa dominant hybrids. There were one finger or two finger bags. If someone scored a whole Oz, you’d sit there and stare at the wonder of it all.

HomeFree
Well-Known Member
  • Aug 6, 2016
  • #12

I run across a seed every ounce or so. I have vaped small loads with ground seed and I could easily taste the seed. Make sure you don’t have any because they do taste bad. I will leave some ground stem in as a filler but too much tastes bad and I don’t think stems have any heads on them.

I do not miss seeds popping cherries off of joints and flying into my hair or under my collar.

VegNVape
Increase the Peace
  • Aug 6, 2016
  • #13

Ha! Didn’t you know? Vaping seeds makes you impotent!

AcidWolf
Member
  • Aug 6, 2016
  • #14

I remember way back before I started vaporizing we would turn the top of a cardboard box upside down and use a playing card to scoop the shake to the top to let the seeds fall down into the inside edge. I would also sometimes put the shake and seeds on a paper plate or sheet of paper and shake it back and forth to separate the seeds. Also the same thing but use a magazine with a smooth cover if the herbs are of better quality and have more trichomes. Those seeds were all just thrown away back then. I’m glad those days are long gone.

Today I rarely see a seed, but if I do find one it is like a bonus gift that is saved for later. I think I found 3 seeds last year, but zero so far this year. A few times in the past I have found a seed when stirring the SSV wand bowl after taking a hit and I will just scoop it out and trash it. I don’t remember ever having a seed combust when vaporizing. If a seed happens to get in the bowl, I will usually notice in one or two hits from the taste or when stirring the bowl.

I know a guy who used to save all of his stems for dry spells. He would use them when making a green dragon mixture, or he would grind them up to collect the kief.

The IcySurfer Global Medical Marijuana & Health Resource

Michigan > Emerald Triangle > Mendocino > San Francisco > Amsterdam

Culture and Cultivation

Trends and Paradigm Poppers

06/16/2014

Popping a Pack of Medical Marijuana Seeds – Germination Techniques

Money has been Allocated – The Order placed. The Post Office Box rented – Dice Thrown.

With Great excitement Your order has been submitted with a Dutch Medical Marijuana Seed Broker.
There are several to choose from. Pick one that has a good record of Stealth Packaging, and a policy to re-Send seeds if they get held up at US Customs.

Quality Genetics often cost between 8 and 20 dollars a seed. Feminised Versions of course, are more expensive. It is IMPERATIVE that the Company issues the seeds in the "Original Breeder Packs," to help in Positive Identification. If the seeds get re-packaged into a generic plastic bag, it is impossible to identify it, as they do not come with name tags.

Upon Growing, make sure to keep Your Labeling Accurate at all times. Avoiding that sort of confusion is helpful to keep things organized.

There are 3 Tried-and-True Old-School Methods for germinating Medical Marijuana Seeds.

1) The Natural Way – keeping a wet substrate is important, or the taproot will dry out. The only nourishment the small seedling can obtain will be coming from that lone root for a week or so. One can utilize a typical soil, or a pre-made Soiless / Peat mix, such as Pro-Mix or Sunshine Mix. The lowest percentage shot at germination is using this method over the below two.

2) Soaking Method :  Some Folks soak the seeds in water over night, planting the beans after they float. The theory behind this is that the casing or husk of the seed is softened, making it easier for it to crack – allowing the taproot to be exposed and start the growing process. Most often, after the soaking process, the seed goes directly into a substrate, such as the ones mentioned above.

3) The Paper Towel Method :  A very popular technique. One simply soaks a paper towel not quite thoroughly. The seeds are folded within (making sure to keep aware of which seeds are which) the wet Paper Towel until a Taproot extends from the seeds. At that point. the rooting Bean can be planted in substrate, or even a hydroponic medium such as Rockwool plugs or cubes. It is important to put the wet paper towel between two plates and store in the darkness. The Paper Towel needs to be kept moist, but not soaking throughout the process. The seeds can be brought into the light in order to add water to the Towel. The light will not harm the seeds. It is wise to extricate the rooted seeds as soon as the taproot extends from the cracked seed. The fine, minute root hairs can adhere to the Paper Towel, and pulling it off can damage the tender new shoots. The Taproot is inserted 1/4" deep pointed down, and kept moist. The cotyledon (or first leaves) will burst
from the substrate within 2-3 days.

There are those who "Scuff" the outer surface of the shell with sandpaper, previous to soaking or otherwise germinating. The theory is that the shell is thinned a bit, thus allowing it to "Crack" easier. There are some seeds with casings so hard that they will not crack.

In addition, occasionally a seed grows such that the husk seems to get caught and will not fall on its' own. The leaves show an irregular pattern. Occasionally, it is necessary to gingerly remove the Shell Casing, or "Helmet," to help the plant get through this very challenging period in its' life. An extreme and interesting case of this is pictured.

The Gangly Period, or "Coltish Stage" as I call it, when the seedling seems unable to stand on its' own – often requires a support for the small inches-tall seedling. After a couple weeks, the stem is stockier, and can support the plants' weight.

A light fan in the space, moving the plants ever so slightly adds to the stem's strength over time. Using a pencil, bamboo skewer or some other item, until the small plant finds its' legs is recommended.

It is always good to supply heat under the small pots. Insure that the Heating Pad being used is not going to get oo hot for the tender plants. Some Heating Pads made for the Cultivation Industry can heat up too hot, as they work in addition to the room's already present heat which may be high already, depending on enviornmental conditions and season.

Enjoy Your New Genetics, as "Seed Plants" have a great deal more Vigor than clones do. You will be surprised at the strong growth. These plants can grow to be very large. Especially Outdoors.

Good Luck out there.

c Kenneth Aaron 2014

Posted at 10:21 AM | Permalink

Comments

Money has been Allocated – The Order placed. The Post Office Box rented – Dice Thrown.

With Great excitement Your order has been submitted with a Dutch Medical Marijuana Seed Broker.
There are several to choose from. Pick one that has a good record of Stealth Packaging, and a policy to re-Send seeds if they get held up at US Customs.

Quality Genetics often cost between 8 and 20 dollars a seed. Feminised Versions of course, are more expensive. It is IMPERATIVE that the Company issues the seeds in the "Original Breeder Packs," to help in Positive Identification. If the seeds get re-packaged into a generic plastic bag, it is impossible to identify it, as they do not come with name tags.

Upon Growing, make sure to keep Your Labeling Accurate at all times. Avoiding that sort of confusion is helpful to keep things organized.

There are 3 Tried-and-True Old-School Methods for germinating Medical Marijuana Seeds.

1) The Natural Way – keeping a wet substrate is important, or the taproot will dry out. The only nourishment the small seedling can obtain will be coming from that lone root for a week or so. One can utilize a typical soil, or a pre-made Soiless / Peat mix, such as Pro-Mix or Sunshine Mix. The lowest percentage shot at germination is using this method over the below two.

2) Soaking Method :  Some Folks soak the seeds in water over night, planting the beans after they float. The theory behind this is that the casing or husk of the seed is softened, making it easier for it to crack – allowing the taproot to be exposed and start the growing process. Most often, after the soaking process, the seed goes directly into a substrate, such as the ones mentioned above.

3) The Paper Towel Method :  A very popular technique. One simply soaks a paper towel not quite thoroughly. The seeds are folded within (making sure to keep aware of which seeds are which) the wet Paper Towel until a Taproot extends from the seeds. At that point. the rooting Bean can be planted in substrate, or even a hydroponic medium such as Rockwool plugs or cubes. It is important to put the wet paper towel between two plates and store in the darkness. The Paper Towel needs to be kept moist, but not soaking throughout the process. The seeds can be brought into the light in order to add water to the Towel. The light will not harm the seeds. It is wise to extricate the rooted seeds as soon as the taproot extends from the cracked seed. The fine, minute root hairs can adhere to the Paper Towel, and pulling it off can damage the tender new shoots. The Taproot is inserted 1/4" deep pointed down, and kept moist. The cotyledon (or first leaves) will burst
from the substrate within 2-3 days.

There are those who "Scuff" the outer surface of the shell with sandpaper, previous to soaking or otherwise germinating. The theory is that the shell is thinned a bit, thus allowing it to "Crack" easier. There are some seeds with casings so hard that they will not crack.

In addition, occasionally a seed grows such that the husk seems to get caught and will not fall on its' own. The leaves show an irregular pattern. Occasionally, it is necessary to gingerly remove the Shell Casing, or "Helmet," to help the plant get through this very challenging period in its' life. An extreme and interesting case of this is pictured.

The Gangly Period, or "Coltish Stage" as I call it, when the seedling seems unable to stand on its' own – often requires a support for the small inches-tall seedling. After a couple weeks, the stem is stockier, and can support the plants' weight.

A light fan in the space, moving the plants ever so slightly adds to the stem's strength over time. Using a pencil, bamboo skewer or some other item, until the small plant finds its' legs is recommended.

It is always good to supply heat under the small pots. Insure that the Heating Pad being used is not going to get oo hot for the tender plants. Some Heating Pads made for the Cultivation Industry can heat up too hot, as they work in addition to the room's already present heat which may be high already, depending on enviornmental conditions and season.

Enjoy Your New Genetics, as "Seed Plants" have a great deal more Vigor than clones do. You will be surprised at the strong growth. These plants can grow to be very large. Especially Outdoors.

Seeds Vs. Clones: A Buyer’s Guide To Good Genetics

A good grow, regardless of scale, starts with one of two things: a clone or a seed. Cloning is the act of taking a cutting from a mature plant (preferably while in a vegetated state) then rooting said cutting with the use of water or a growth hormone. As the name suggests, you’re making a genetic copy. This process is highly popular among commercial growers due to its convenience and genetic consistency.

Cannabis is the most diverse species of plant on this planet, and you can thank our prohibition-era basement-grow pioneers for that. Unfortunately, these folks didn’t make an effort to stabilize the breeds with true breeding practices. As a result, there aren’t many cannabis breeders who have true breeding lines.

Lack of formality made the cannabis seed more unstable, compared to your typical cucumber or tomato seed. Simply put: there’s just no telling what you might get from a seed in terms of phenotype or genotype. A clone, at least, gives you a better idea of what to expect.

No other industry in agriculture relies on cloning practices so heavily. When it comes to true breeding, cannabis is a good 80 years behind. Seeds grown using true breeding techniques offer the same level of consistency from parent to progeny as cloning does. For example, buying a cucumber seed will produce a near perfect progeny, because they are more genetically stable than the typical cannabis seed.

Cannabis seeds are the unique children of two different parents, offspring with variations from two genetically different parents. OG Kush and Trainwreck are two genotypically different varieties. Crossing them only results in something with a completely different genetic makeup, giving you an entirely different variety! See Mendel’s Law for a high school biology blast from the past.

Offspring you see from cannabis seeds are diverse; no two will be alike. Biology necessitates diversity. What follows is a healthier, happier plant. Breeders will typically spend months and years cultivating a new plant from seed into a generational line, all in an attempt to nail down the perfect variety to clone.

These clones, taken from their mother, will be planted—over and over—until the mother dies and is replaced using a cutting from its copy. Eventually these generational lines begin to decay, resulting in poorer general health and smaller yields. This is when farms will start selling clones, just to try and maintain a profit. If your budtender isn’t sure where along the generational spectrum a clone sits, then you should seriously consider buying seeds.

Cloning offers you a nice head start, without a doubt. Growing from seed takes time and a little more money, depending on where you get your seedlings. Typical prices range from $12 to $30 for a clone while nitrogen sealed cans filled with 8 or 10 seeds run up to $70-$100 each. For some people, this might seem a little steep. But maybe putting another five on it for the sake of assurance is such a bad thing?

We cannot deny the convenience cloning offers. If you’re short on money and time, we recommend using a clone. Just make sure you ask your budtender if the clone was taken from a mother that was the original offspring of an initial cross. Otherwise, your clone might become susceptible to health problems caused by a generational mutation known as telomere-shortening.

Below is an overview of how you can germinate your own seeds. Take a look and see if this route seems right for you.

Popping Pot Properly

Popping is simply a term that describes the act of germination. Below are some brief and easy instructions on how to awaken a dormant seedling.

Things you need
  1. Two plates
  2. Paper towels
  3. Water
  4. Seeds
  5. That’s it!
Doing the thing
  • Tear off a single piece off your roll of paper towels
  • Soak it thoroughly with water then squeeze out any excess
  • Place the towel flat on on of your plates.
  • Take your seeds out from their packaging and put them on the wetted paper towel
  • Make sure you do not put the seeds too close together, give them room to push out their root
  • Take another moist paper towel and place it on top of the seeds but make sure you squeeze out any excess water before doing so
  • Place the second plate over the first so it resembles a space saucer
  • Maintain a temperature of 69 degrees when storing your space saucer so that your aliens inside don’t get too cold
  • Water after the first day
  • Continue watering on a staggered schedule until you begin
  • If nothing happens to your seeds after 15 days then they are probably bogus
    • Note: It is more common to see germination after 72 hours. Very rarely will you wait longer.
    Transferring & Planting Seeds

    After you’ve spotted some roots. Go ahead and carefully transport your popped pot babies into a growing medium of your choice. We recommend either rockwool, Happy Frog soil from Fox Farm, or the ever popular coco-fiber.

    • Note: Make sure the coco-fiber you buy has been washed of any salt build up as some coco-fiber contains excess salts. Plants don’t like salt. Actually, they hate it. So yeah, just don’t.

    Before planting, make a cavity two times bigger than the seedling is long. About 2 to 5 millimeters below the surface should do. The key here is to make sure you block any light while also ensuring the youngling has a fair chance to push through.