Posted on

images of cannabis seeds

Cannabis seed Images, Pictures in .jpg Stock Photos

Cannabis seeds isolated on white background. Marijuana grains, herbal treatment product macro view.

Macro Close Up of Cannabis Hemp Seeds

forcep seed grow plant marijuana

cannabis seeds. Close-up. top view.

Cannabis seeds in a bowl on a wooden background

Hands with blue latex gloves taking seeds of CBD hemp from sack in factory forming heart. Medicinal and recreational marijuana plants cultivation.

Ripening seeds on a cannabis plant on a blurred natural background.

Farmer Holding a Cannabis Plant, Farmers are planting marijuana seedlings.

Cannabis seeds on white background

marijuana sprout in soil close-up dark background

Cannabis hemp seed

Cannabis seeds in bowl on dark textured background

Hand gently holding rich soil for his marijuana plants

Hands taking a lot of seeds of CBD hemp from sack in factory

Oil hemp in two jars and sauceboat on wooden board

Hemp seed close-up (cannabis)

Cannabis Seeds Tiger Stripes in Group on White Background

Heap of hemp seeds on white background

Cannabis sprout isolated on white background. Growing hemp

Cannabis hemp seed

Hemp seeds background in macro.

cannabis seed detail

marijuana, Cannabis seedling, A small plant of cannabis seedlings at the stage of vegetation planted in the ground in the sun.

Hemp oil n a glass jar

Organic dried hemp seeds, flour, kernels in wooden spoon on white background. View from above.

Scientific research of medical cannabis for use in medicine

Oil hemp in jar with seed in sack on board

cannabis hemp seed

Marijuana seeds on wooden spoon and marijuana leaf on wood background – Cannabis seeds Hemp medical

Medical cannabis seeds

Cannabis seeds in a metal spoon, isolated on white background. Marijuana grains pile, herbal treatment product, healthy eating, macro view.

Marijuana plant with joints

Hemp seeds on a plate and in a sieve on a gray blue stone

Medical cannabis bud

Hemp seeds and flour

Extreme close up of cannabis leaf and seeds

Unpeeled hemp – Cannabis sativa – in small dark wooden bowl cup with spoon, closeup detail

arijuana leaves on a black background top view

Cannabis research, Cultivation of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), flowering cannabis plant as a legal medicinal drug, herb, ready to harvest

hemp seeds on wood background

Cannabis Seedling in Peat

Hemp seed Background

Hemp seeds with a green leaf

Farmer holding dry cannabis seeds

Hemp seeds collection isolated on white background, close up, macro

Macro photos of marijuana plant with leaves and seed on the side before harvesting. The cannabis plant close up view. Plant of marijuana medical use with a high content of CBD

Virginia Law

Creating a Report: Check the sections you’d like to appear in the report, then use the “Create Report” button at the bottom of the page to generate your report. Once the report is generated you’ll then have the option to download it as a pdf, print or email the report.

18VAC110-60-240. Security requirements.

A. A pharmaceutical processor shall initially cultivate only the number of Cannabis plants necessary to produce cannabis products for the number of patients anticipated within the first nine months of operation. Thereafter, the processor shall

not maintain cannabis product in excess of the quantity required for normal, efficient operation.

B. At no time shall a cannabis dispensing facility maintain cannabis products in excess of the quantity required for normal, efficient operation.

C. Items a pharmaceutical processor shall properly secure include Cannabis plants, seeds, parts of plants, extracts, and cannabis products. A cannabis dispensing facility shall properly secure cannabis products. To secure these items a pharmaceutical processor and a cannabis dispensing facility shall:

1. Maintain all Cannabis plants, seeds, parts of plants, extracts, and cannabis products in a secure area or location accessible only by the minimum number of authorized employees essential for efficient operation;

2. Store all cut parts of Cannabis plants, extracts, or cannabis products in an approved safe or approved vault within the pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility and not sell cannabis products when the pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility is closed;

3. Keep all approved safes, approved vaults, or any other approved equipment or areas used for the production, cultivation, harvesting, processing, manufacturing, or storage of cannabis products securely locked or protected from entry, except for the actual time required to remove or replace the Cannabis, seeds, parts of plants, extracts, or cannabis products;

4. Keep all locks and security equipment in good working order;

5. Restrict access to keys or codes to all safes, approved vaults, or other approved equipment or areas in the dispensing area to pharmacists practicing at the pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility;

6. Restrict access to keys or codes to all safes, approved vaults, or other approved equipment or areas in the cultivation and production areas to the responsible party and to those authorized by the responsible party who shall be the pharmacists practicing in the processor or persons supervising cultivation-related or production-related activities at the processor; and

7. Not allow keys to be left in the locks or accessible to persons not authorized by the PIC or responsible party.

D. Employees, other than a pharmacist or person supervising cultivation-related or production-related activities at the processor, but so designated by the PIC or responsible party, may have the ability to unlock a secured area to gain entrance to perform required job duties, but only during hours of operation of the processor or dispensing facility. At no time shall these employees have access to the security system.

E. The pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall have an adequate security system to prevent and detect diversion, theft, or loss of Cannabis seeds, plants, extracts, or cannabis products. A device for the detection of breaking and a back-up alarm system with an ability to remain operational during a power outage shall be installed in each pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility. The installation and the device shall be based on accepted alarm industry standards and subject to the following conditions:

1. The device shall be a sound, microwave, photoelectric, ultrasonic, or other generally accepted and suitable device;

2. The device shall be monitored in accordance with accepted industry standards, be maintained in operating order, have an auxiliary source of power, and be capable of sending an alarm signal to the monitoring entity when breached if the communication line is not operational;

3. The device shall fully protect the entire processor or facility and shall be capable of detecting breaking by any means when activated;

4. The device shall include a duress alarm, a panic alarm, and an automatic voice dialer; and

5. Access to the alarm system for the dispensing area of the processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall be restricted to the pharmacists working at the pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility, and the system shall be activated whenever the processor or facility is closed for business. Access to the alarm system in areas of a pharmaceutical processor that are designated for cultivation and production shall be restricted to the responsible party and to those authorized by the responsible party who shall be the pharmacists practicing at the pharmaceutical processor or person supervising cultivation-related or production-related activities at the processor.

F. A pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall keep the outside perimeter of the premises well lit. A processor or facility shall have video cameras in all areas that may contain Cannabis plants, seeds, parts of plants, extracts, or cannabis products and at all points of entry and exit, which shall be appropriate for the normal lighting conditions of the area under surveillance.

1. The processor or facility shall direct cameras at all approved safes, approved vaults, dispensing areas, or cannabis products sales areas, and any other area where Cannabis plants, seeds, extracts, or cannabis products are being produced, harvested, manufactured, stored, or handled. At entry and exit points, the processor or facility shall angle cameras so as to allow for the capture of clear and certain identification of any person entering or exiting the facility;

2. The video system shall have:

a. A failure notification system that provides an audible, text, or visual notification of any failure in the surveillance system. The failure notification system shall provide an alert to the processor or facility within five minutes of the failure, either by telephone, email, or text message;

b. The ability to immediately produce a clear color still photo that is a minimum of 9600 dpi from any camera image, live or recorded;

c. A date and time stamp embedded on all recordings. The date and time shall be synchronized and set correctly and shall not significantly obscure the picture; and

d. The ability to remain operational during a power outage;

3. All video recordings shall allow for the exporting of still images in an industry standard image format. Exported video shall have the ability to be archived in a proprietary format that ensures authentication of the video and guarantees that no alteration of the recorded image has taken place. Exported video shall also have the ability to be saved in an industry standard file format that can be played on a standard computer operating system. A pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall erase all recordings prior to disposal or sale of the facility; and

4. The processor or facility shall make 24-hour recordings from all video cameras available for immediate viewing by the board or the board’s agent upon request and shall retain the recordings for at least 30 days. If a processor or facility is aware of a pending criminal, civil, or administrative investigation or legal proceeding for which a recording may contain relevant information, the processor or facility shall retain an unaltered copy of the recording until the investigation or proceeding is closed or the entity conducting the investigation or proceeding notifies the pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility PIC that it is not necessary to retain the recording.

G. The processor or facility shall maintain all security system equipment and recordings in a secure location so as to prevent theft, loss, destruction, or alterations. All security equipment shall be maintained in good working order and shall be tested at least every six months.

H. A pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall limit access to surveillance areas to persons who are essential to surveillance operations, law-enforcement agencies, security system service employees, the board or the board’s agent, and others when approved by the board. A processor or facility shall make available a current list of authorized employees and security system service employees who have access to the surveillance room to the processor or facility. The pharmaceutical processor or cannabis dispensing facility shall keep all onsite surveillance rooms locked and shall not use such rooms for any other function.

I. If diversion, theft, or loss of Cannabis plants, seeds, parts of plants, extracts, or cannabis products has occurred from a pharmaceutical processor, the board may require additional safeguards to ensure the security of the products.

Derived from Virginia Register Volume 35, Issue 23, eff. August 7, 2019; amended, Virginia Register Volume 37, Issue 1, eff. September 30, 2020; Volume 37, Issue 25, eff. September 1, 2021; Errata, 38:1 VA.R. 172 August 30, 2021.

Website addresses provided in the Virginia Administrative Code to documents incorporated by reference are for the reader’s convenience only, may not necessarily be active or current, and should not be relied upon. To ensure the information incorporated by reference is accurate, the reader is encouraged to use the source document described in the regulation.

As a service to the public, the Virginia Administrative Code is provided online by the Virginia General Assembly. We are unable to answer legal questions or respond to requests for legal advice, including application of law to specific fact. To understand and protect your legal rights, you should consult an attorney.

Clones Versus Seeds: What’s The Best Way To Grow A Cannabis Product?

Wondering whether a clone or a seed produces the best harvest is likely not a thought that occurs to the layperson, but it’s one that cannabis producers spend significant time considering.

Picking between seed and clone affects almost everything about the final cannabis product. The source of the cannabis plant affects the potency of the flower, the quantity and size of the buds, and the growth-to-maturity process, all components crucial to creating a quality cannabis product.

Despite decades of cannabis cultivation, debate on which of the two is “the best” source remains heated. Many seed growers, for example, argue that their plants are more pest resistant and have larger buds than their clone-grown counterparts, and some clone-growers argue the exact opposite.

On a commercial scale, the divide is smaller. The majority of cannabis producers employ clone-based cannabis production and use seeds to pick strong “mothers.”

Marijuana Company of America Inc. (OTC:MCOA), for example, recently acquired VBF Brands Inc., a clone-focused cannabis producer. It joins Tilray Inc. (NASDAQ:TLRY), Canopy Growth Corp. (NASDAQ:CGC), Greenway Greenhouse Cannabis Corp. (CSE:GWAY) and many others by developing an emphasis on clone-based cannabis cultivation.

Why is this the case? And why are there still seed advocates if the corporate world seems adamant about clones?

Clones Versus Seeds

Each growing method has benefits and drawbacks. Depending on the grower’s context, one may be more suitable than the other.

Seeds: The Pros

  • Cannabis plants germinating from seeds have a taproot, which many cultivators believe supplies more support and nutrients to the plant.
  • Cannabis plants germinating from seeds do not inherit diseases or weak immunity from the mother plant.
  • Cannabis plants germinating from seeds possess more variety, which could be a pro if you’re looking for product differentiation.
  • Seeds last much longer than clones when stored properly.

Seeds: The Cons

  • Growers must invest time – typically around six weeks – before they know the sex of the plant. Because the industry values females, this is a major risk, particularly when the seeds are purchased from an unreliable source.
  • Seed growers have to be patient because the growing process is much longer than with clones.

Clones: The Pros

Clones are cuttings from a mature mother marijuana plant that grow into new identical plants.

  • Clone growers know the sex of the plant beforehand. They can still become hermaphrodites if stressed, but out of the gate, they’re female. Only females provide the buds that produce a marijuana high.
  • Starting with a clone with a track record of previous harvests gives producers a good idea of what to expect from their plants.
  • Clones speed up the cultivation process. Seeds take time to sprout and grow into a plant, but clones are already parts of plants.
  • Clones are “plug and play,” meaning they’re easier to cultivate.

Clones: The Cons

  • Clones lack a taproot, which some reputable growers believe makes the plant stronger and healthier. A taproot grows vertically downward from the plant base, forming a center through which other roots sprout.
  • Some cannabis clones have diseases that are carried over from the mother plant.
  • With clones, growers are limited to what they can find in the area. Dispensaries and stores are helping increase variety, but it pales compared to most seed banks.
  • Clones have a limited shelf life. They must be planted quickly, or they lose their ability to grow into plants.

Generally, clones are important when a grower has found a particularly interesting strain and wants to mass-produce it, while seeds are important for cultivating variety and for creating benchmarks through which clones are based.

For more on how the professionals approach this debate, visit Marijuana Company of America’s website here.

This post contains sponsored advertising content. This content is for informational purposes only and not intended to be investing advice.

For the latest in financial news, exclusive stories, memes follow Benzinga on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram. For the best interviews, stock market talk & videos, subscribe to Benzinga Podcasts and our YouTube channel.