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egyptian musk seeds

Musk Seeds (Abelmoschus moschatus) – India

Musk seeds (Abelmoschus moschatus) from India have a wonderfully sweet, flowery and heavy fragrance similar to musk. They are also known as “ambrette seeds” or “rose mallow seeds”.

Ambrette seeds come from a tropical, weedy plant which is surprising similarity to okra! The highly prized seeds gained popularity in France, Germany and other countries for it’s precious fragrance and aromatic oil.

It was used as a treatment for many medicinal issues, from various stomach ailments to heart disease to gonorrhea and urinary problems.

Medical Disclaimer: Our expertise lies in incense making and fragrance. Information contained on these pages is solely for your enjoyment. We can not provide medical advice or recipes as we are not health professionals. Before ingesting anything that is not food, we strongly suggest seeking counsel from a licensed health practitioner.

  • Description
  • Reviews (2)

Description

Musk seeds (Abelmoschus moschatus) from India have a wonderfully sweet, flowery and heavy fragrance similar to musk. They are also known as “ambrette seeds” or “rose mallow seeds”.

Ambrette seeds come from a tropical, weedy plant which is surprising similarity to okra! The highly prized seeds gained popularity in France, Germany and other countries for it’s precious fragrance and aromatic oil.

It was used as a treatment for many medicinal issues, from various stomach ailments to heart disease to gonorrhea and urinary problems.

Medical Disclaimer: Our expertise lies in incense making and fragrance. Information contained on these pages is solely for your enjoyment. We can not provide medical advice or recipes as we are not health professionals. Before ingesting anything that is not food, we strongly suggest seeking counsel from a licensed health practitioner.

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Ambrette Seed CO2 – Fine

This very Fine Ambrette Seed CO2, in our opinion, presents an intriguing, very complex aromatic profile – intensely rich, sweet, nutty/seed-like, musky-floral, rounded with nuances of Cognac, Clary Sage, Tobacco back notes, and underscored with the subtle, sensual character of leather and animalic notes all through the long drydown. It is an extremely tenacious, excellent fixative that improves with age. Amazing!

Ambrette Seed CO2 is a notable aromatic oil extracted from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus, the Hibiscus plant, native to the tropics of Asia, Northern Australia and Africa; it is a close relative of okra and now also grows in the tropics of Central and South America. The Latin, abelmoschus, is derived from Arabic and means the ‘source of’ or ‘father of musk’. The historical uses of Ambrette Seed in tobaccos, candies and liqueurs are legendary.

In perfumery applications, Ambrette Seed is an excellent fixative with an exalting effect – in other words, it has a unique way of lifting or enhancing the quality of a perfume. 1 It provides the botanical version of the musk aroma so highly prized in natural/botanical perfumery, as well as a much healthier choice compared to synthetic musks for use in perfume formulas. Its sensual aroma is considered by many to be a compelling aphrodisiac. A little Ambrette Seed CO2 goes a long way and very little is needed in base accords to achieve the desired effect.

For information regarding the aromatherapeutic attributes of Ambrette Seed, please see:

  • L’Aromathérapie Exactement, Pierre Franchomme and Dr. Daniel Pénoël, 1990, p. 357.
  • The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, 2013, pp. 35-6.
  • Aromantics, Valerie Ann Worwood, 1987, p. 25.
  • “Study of the Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil, Oleoresin and its Volatile Product Obtained from Ambrette (Abelmoschus moschatus Moench) Seeds,” L Cravo, F. Périneau, et al., Flavour and Fragrance Journal, 1992, 7(2): 65-67, https://www.ukessays.com/essays/chemistry/chemical-composition-ambrette-essential-7950.php
  • “Characterization of Ambrette Seed Oil and Its Mode of Action in Bacteria,” S Arokiyaraj, SH Choi, et al., Molecules, 2015, 20: 384-395, https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org
    /a5e8/2293814942200474e42ce021d7a216201662.pdf
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For information regarding the use of Ambrette Seed in perfumery, please see:

  • “Ambrette Seeds, Okra, and ‘Botanical Musk’,” Doc Elly in Perfume Project NW, August 2010, http://perfumenw.blogspot.com/2010/08/ambrette-seeds-okra-and-botanical-musk.html
  • “Aphrodisiac of the Day: Ambrette Seed,” Ayala Moriel in Smellyblog, January 2012, https://ayalamoriel.com/blogs/smellyblog/16967895-aphrodisiac-of-the-day-ambrette-seed
  • “Decoding Obscure Notes Part I: Vegetable Musks,” Ayala Moriel in Smellyblog, February 2006, http://ayalasmellyblog.blogspot.com/2006/02/decoding-obscure-notes-part-i-vegetale.html
  • “Natural Ingredient Focus: Ambrette Seed,” Liz Cook in One Seed Blog, July 2016, https://oneseedperfumes.com/blogs/news/ingredient-focus-ambrette-seed

Aromatic Profile: Intensely rich, sweet, nutty/seed-like, musky-floral, nuances of Cognac, Clary Sage, Tobacco back notes, underscored with subtle, sensual leather and animalic notes; an extremely tenacious, excellent fixative that improves with age.

Appearance: Pale yellow, transparent, slightly viscous liquid. Product may contain some particulate matter. Please note that this extract is viscous at room temperature and may require special use instructions to blend.

Use: Aromatherapy / Natural Perfumery / Incense.

Blending Suggestions: Dilute and add drop by drop to your blends (very small amounts to start with) until the desired effect is achieved.

Safety Considerations: None known; has GRAS status (Generally Recognized as Safe). 3 Dilute before using. A patch test should be performed before use for those with sensitive skin.

1 Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, 1960, pp. 59-60.

3 Tisserand, Robert and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety, 2 nd ed., 2014, p. 193.